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Teaching Values of
Being Human - Videos

Index of videos

1. Presentation video, 26:21
The presentation focuses on Chapter 1: ‘a short guide to teaching Social and Emotional Literacy’ from Mark’s latest book, TEACHING VALUES of BEING HUMAN (2020)


2. Promotion video #1, 1:16
“Our children must know they are loved, and that we are an extraordinarily capable race, with deep capabilities to pull together when needed. This is where our hope lies. Our future is our collective selves. In being community.”


3. Promotion video #2, 1:11
“Our young must be coached to revel in the fact that they are alive and have been given the opportunity to see, breathe, feel, do, exist and celebrate life. They are a matchless creation on this fabulous blue planet.”


4. Video #1, 1:03
“There’s a wind of change in global education, and its breathtaking and persistent.”


5. Video #2, 1:59
“Now, it’s our turn to teach the beauty of being human to children.”


6. Video #3, 56s
“The expansion of these capabilities motivates young people to look inside themselves, to grow, to reach out to family, to friends and further, with consciousness and kindness.”


7. Video #4, 51s
“Here is a curriculum that keeps us, and young people in humanistic rehearsal.”


8. Video #5, 1:59
“Social and emotional education conveys the skills to reach out and connect to significant others. What a gift to give to our young.”


9. Video #6, 1:01
“It’s the human qualities we must develop in our young because the jobs likely to be ‘future-proofed’ are those that radiate human understandings, connections and collaborative skills at peak levels.”


10. Video #7, 33s
“Our young people, individually and collectively, possess a great richness. What we must do is invest in them so they can invest in themselves.”


11. Video #8, 38s
“Now is not who a child will be in the future, but what we do now, and how we do it, sets their trajectory.”


12. Video #9, 1:20
“Our commitment must be to position young people, whether we be teachers in classrooms or parents at home, in places where the warmth and safety of our kinship transcends all else.”


13. Video #10, 48:43
'Mis'behaviour and humane ideas to influence positive changes

Presentation Video

This presentation by Mark Le Messurier was moved to video for ‘Generation Next’ due to COVID-19 and the cancelation of live events in 2020. It is Mark and Gen Next’s way to model resiliency!

The presentation focuses on Chapter 1: ‘a short guide to teaching Social and Emotional Literacy’ from Mark’s latest book, TEACHING VALUES of BEING HUMAN (2020) – teachingvaluesofbeinghuman.com.au Mark highlights two things. Firstly, we humans are wired for social connection. And, when this connection occurs, there is a profound rise to how we feel about ourselves, how we relate to others, how we learn and to our mental health. The consequence of being taught how to find one’s tribe is a necessary protective factor against isolation and loneliness. We now know a well-developed Social and Emotional capabilities carries more weight in life satisfaction than a good IQ, good grades or good looks.

Secondly, Mark explores an ‘informal approach’ to developing Social and emotional Literacy skills in young people of all ages in various situations. He provides you with a host of easy to implement ideas to take away and set into action!

Promotion Video #1

“Our children must know they are loved, and that we are an extraordinarily capable race, with deep capabilities to pull together when needed. This is where our hope lies. Our future is our collective selves. In being community.”

Promotion Video #2

“Our young must be coached to revel in the fact that they are alive and have been given the opportunity to see, breathe, feel, do, exist and celebrate life. They are a matchless creation on this fabulous blue planet.”

Video #1

“There’s a wind of change in global education, and its breathtaking and persistent.”

Video #2

“Now, it’s our turn to teach the beauty of being human to children.”

Video #3

“The expansion of these capabilities motivates young people to look inside themselves, to grow, to reach out to family, to friends and further, with consciousness and kindness.”

Video #4

“Here is a curriculum that keeps us, and young people in humanistic rehearsal.”

Video #5

“Social and emotional education conveys the skills to reach out and connect to significant others. What a gift to give to our young.”

Video #6

“It’s the human qualities we must develop in our young because the jobs likely to be ‘future-proofed’ are those that radiate human understandings, connections and collaborative skills at peak levels.”

Video #7

“Our young people, individually and collectively, possess a great richness. What we must do is invest in them so they can invest in themselves.”

Video #8

“Now is not who a child will be in the future, but what we do now, and how we do it, sets their trajectory.”

Video #9

“Our commitment must be to position young people, whether we be teachers in classrooms or parents at home, in places where the warmth and safety of our kinship transcends all else.”

Video #10

'Mis'behaviour and humane ideas to influence positive changes
Or, The 4 goals of 'mis'behaviour

This video is from chapter 8 of TVoBH. It presents a humanitarian approach to interpreting and working with the trickier emotions and behaviours expressed by the young people in our care. To do this, we use our 'soft eyes' and 'warm hearts' to humanely reframe what their behaviour is communicating. Yes, young people do not always choose their behaviour. More to the point, it may be an innate response to stay safe, feel in control, feel worthy or self-protect.

Let's review the "ladder of discouragement". It's the pathway all human beings take to find social recognition, or to feel as though they belong or have value. Each rung on the ladder is a deeper level of despair and is reflected by a deeper level of difficult behaviour. With the benefit of hindsight and science, we now know that many of our traditional disciplinary-styled responses to manage tricky behaviours in children were seriously flawed. Sadly, our interventions often strengthened patterns of toxic stress and caused increased emotional and behavioural challenges. We have learnt that wellbeing, emotion, behaviour and learning cannot be separated because emotion rules reasoning.

Video #11

Nurturing emotional awareness, intelligence and resilience

Today, there is a deepening expectation on every educator to do much more than simply build a healthy emotional classroom climate. This chapter, presented on video, offers an array of conversations and activities that stimulate the growth of emotional intelligence and resilient thinking in young people. It showcases our greatest human assets; our emotions, and how to use relationship, empathy and self-regulation to raise the well-being of ourselves, and others. The challenge, however, is much more than presenting a few activities, tips or tricks to students. The development of these precious emotional assets is best promoted when we purposely maintain a social and emotional 'sweet spot' where these potentials are continuously encouraged to shine!